Are You Needy?

How many times have you gotten into a conversation with someone and the first thing you asked was “how may I serve you?” When was the last time you went to an individual you needed something from and asked what you could do for them… don’t worry, i’ll wait.

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Many of us carry around a needy energy. We go from one social interaction to another, thinking of what we can take from the conversation instead of what we can add to it. Even in giving advice or adding our opinions, often times we do so as a release for ourselves.

I am realizing more each day that the greatest gift I could give in a conversation is a listening ear and a genuine compliment. This also holds true when it comes to physical requests. I used to approach clients in a “what do I get out of this” mentality, simply because the other party did the same and therefore we were two opposing energies looking for our win.

One of greatest examples of needy energy I’ve heard was from a random old man on YouTube who was explaining how our neediness repels and our giving attracts. It may seem common sense that you will attract others if you are a giver, but the act of giving runs deeper than a physical exchange.

When we recognize our abundance through the act of giving, it is an indication to the universe that we have more than enough.

When we are needy however, the universe recognizes us as living a life of lack, which only brings more of that into our reality.

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I used to think that if I “gave too much” I would have nothing left, but once I made the decision to come into interactions with something to offer before I asked for anything, my entire experienced changed.

Though our company is still in its baby stages, I have never experienced as much abundance as I do now, simply because I seek to be of service. I now seek to meet the needs of others as opposed living a life in need.

Tinashe Hwande

Edited by. Tayla Hasselbach

Why Pain Creates Change

Pain is the greatest human motivator. As much as I’d like to think that we change due to the compelling, heart-warming emotions of ecstasy and bliss, the reality is that human beings move when things go to sh**.

Remember touching a hot stove for the first time? I bet nothing was more compelling than feeling the skin peel back on your index finger as the heat of the stove scorched your flesh. No warning signs or cautionary tales could have done what experience did for you on this unfortunate day.

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Pain is an indicator of misalignment. The more pain we feel, the more drastic our actions will be to remove it from our lives. We eat ourselves into hospitals knowing that McDonalds for breakfast, lunch, and dinner is an elixir for disaster, but the pain of finding out we are on the brink of heart failure elicits enough pain to bring about a change.

As Tony Robbins states: “we do things for one of two reasons, to seek pleasure or avoid pain.” In most cases, the need for pleasure is outweighed by the pain in our lives. Pain does not have to be physical, in fact most cases the pain that leads to the greatest change is internal. When we feel the heavy mental burdens of unattended emotions, we are forced to look inward and this inner reflection allows us to find what it is that needs our attention.

Pain is not inherently bad, it is simply a mechanism our bodies use to warn us. Imagine how many limbs we would lose on a daily basis if we could not feel pain, or the ignored, emotional wounds that would go unnoticed until it was too late if pain was out of the equation.

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Pain can be an ally and even a temporary friend that is meant to unveil something to you, but just like any guest overstaying their welcome, a consistent pain often becomes an issue.

I am learning to no longer ignore my pain or view it as a  punishment from the ruling powers of this universe. I truly believe this universe works in alignment with us and our duty is to align ourselves with it, otherwise it will use any tool in its abundant arsenal to get us back in line. Pain happens to be one of the most effective of these tools.

Tinashe Hwande

Edited by. Tayla Hasselbach