Why Pain Creates Change

Pain is the greatest human motivator. As much as I’d like to think that we change due to the compelling, heart-warming emotions of ecstasy and bliss, the reality is that human beings move when things go to sh**.

Remember touching a hot stove for the first time? I bet nothing was more compelling than feeling the skin peel back on your index finger as the heat of the stove scorched your flesh. No warning signs or cautionary tales could have done what experience did for you on this unfortunate day.

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Pain is an indicator of misalignment. The more pain we feel, the more drastic our actions will be to remove it from our lives. We eat ourselves into hospitals knowing that McDonalds for breakfast, lunch, and dinner is an elixir for disaster, but the pain of finding out we are on the brink of heart failure elicits enough pain to bring about a change.

As Tony Robbins states: “we do things for one of two reasons, to seek pleasure or avoid pain.” In most cases, the need for pleasure is outweighed by the pain in our lives. Pain does not have to be physical, in fact most cases the pain that leads to the greatest change is internal. When we feel the heavy mental burdens of unattended emotions, we are forced to look inward and this inner reflection allows us to find what it is that needs our attention.

Pain is not inherently bad, it is simply a mechanism our bodies use to warn us. Imagine how many limbs we would lose on a daily basis if we could not feel pain, or the ignored, emotional wounds that would go unnoticed until it was too late if pain was out of the equation.

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Pain can be an ally and even a temporary friend that is meant to unveil something to you, but just like any guest overstaying their welcome, a consistent pain often becomes an issue.

I am learning to no longer ignore my pain or view it as a  punishment from the ruling powers of this universe. I truly believe this universe works in alignment with us and our duty is to align ourselves with it, otherwise it will use any tool in its abundant arsenal to get us back in line. Pain happens to be one of the most effective of these tools.

Tinashe Hwande

Edited by. Tayla Hasselbach

 

Taking a Mental Shower

Motivation is bullsh**

I’m sure we’ve all experienced the “different person in the morning when the alarm goes off syndrome”. You know when you set an alarm the night before while telling yourself that tomorrow will finally be the day that you wake up at 5am, fly to the gym, eat a hearty low-carb breakfast, and read an entire chapter of that book you’ve been putting off for the last two weeks.

In reality, your alarm rang, you clicked snooze and woke up right before work with a bagel in your hand… what happened there? Most often we set our next day’s agenda with the motivation we have in the moment, but, as soon as the next day becomes our now, the motivation is lost. This is why motivation is a forever process; we cannot expect to bottle it up and keep its potency forever.

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I used to believe that motivation was the missing link between my current position in life and where I wanted to be. I felt that if I just had enough motivation I could move mountains, but the only thing I moved was my butt from the couch in the moment. I thought motivation was some everlasting elixir that would keep me in motion forever. Little did I know that motivation was no more than a mental shower. Yes a mental shower. Motivation is like a shower, it only lasts for a single day, if that.

What I did not realize in my days of “self-help addiction” was that I could not use yesterday’s motivation to fuel me for the present moment; I had to continuously find sources of motivation which became as tiring as a one legged race. It’s important for us to create deep, lasting reasons for our actions. The acclaimed Simon Senec says, “you must find your WHY”, otherwise known as your inspiration.

Motivation alone will never last, however inspiration is the internal source of consistent action. Whereas motivation can give you the courage to do something momentarily, when someone is truly inspired, they will have a fire within them that burns for an eternity. Think of the great artists that are now physically gone, but their work continues to touch this world hundreds of years later; they are often called “inspirations”.

One man’s inspiration can carry forth to the next and so forth. Motivation is important in moments of intense action, but the energy that allows up to continuously reinvent ourselves is inspiration, either the inspiration of another being of the inspiration of nature’s beauty. Whatever our source of inspiration is, the fact that it is greater than our own will power is what gives it its potency.

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You will always be willing to do more for your child or loved one than you will for yourself (i.e. you would save your dog before yourself) this is the equivalent of inspiration. Inspiration is something that moves you internally. A self help book or a pump up anthem may be able to conjure motivation, but the lasting inspiration needed for true growth is something that comes from within and manifests itself outwardly.

 

What Is Leadership?

Leadership is inspiring. It is taking a stand and motivating others to think, create, accomplish — whatever the task may be. It is creating an open space where effective communication and compromise may occur in order to confidently reach a goal in a timely manner. It is taking on the responsibility of the outcomes of those decisions and facilitating reflection on what could be done better in the future. It is doing all of these things from a pure heart with the sole intention of helping others be the best person they can be in the world.

While pondering who has demonstrated leadership in my life, my sophomore 2 clinical instructor, Amber Quelvog, came to mind. She was one of the best teachers I have ever had and it is through her leadership that I grew exponentially as a nurse this past semester. She was a leader in that she inspired us to be our own leaders, to trust ourselves, and to feel confident and in the right place on the floor in the hospital. She led not by telling us what to do but by guiding us as we used our critical thinking skills to solve the issue at hand on our own. She facilitated our self-reflection as well as gave constructive criticism in a positive manner. I truly look up to her and hope to be a nurse, teacher, and leader like her.

Nursing School Archives (May 2015)

By: Tayla Hasselbach